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Flight to Moscow


Moscow is home to some of the most famous architecture in the world. Fly with Austrian Airlines to Moscow to see it for yourself and experience the outstanding Russian arts and culture. Your first stop must surely be Red Square. Each way you turn, to the "onion" domes of St. Basil’s Cathedral, to the adjacent Kremlin and its walls, to Lenin’s Mausoleum, the view will take your breath away. Did you know that Red Square became a cemetery in 1917? Tombs are beneath the mighty Kremlin wall and, since 1925, more than 100 people have been buried within the wall itself. Moscow also has some 70 theaters dedicated to opera, dance, and other performing arts. The city's museums stretch across natural history, science and technology, the arts, and biographical and historical collections. It is truly a city on a grand scale.

Flights from Moscow (DME)

Central and Eastern Europe

Austrian Airlines flies to all the most important regions of Central and Eastern Europe, further reinforcing our role as the market leader in this region. We also increase the number of flights to existing destinations continuously.

Worth knowing

Russia
  • Currency: Russian rouble(RUB)
  • Language: Russian
  • Capital: Moscow
  • Austrian flight destination: Krasnodar, Moscow, Rostov, St. Petersburg

Airbus 319

Airbus 319 side view Airbus 319 seats
Type of aircraftShort- & medium-haul passenger aircraft
ManufacturerAirbus Industrie, France
Names - Austrian Airlines paintingSofia, Bucharest, Kiev, Moscow, Baku, Sarajevo, Tbilisi
Number of aircraft7
Seating capacity138 C/Y (variable)
Min. Legroom30"=76.2cm
Wing span34,1 m
Length33,8 m
Height11,8 m
Max. cruising speed980 km/h
Max. cruising altitude12,130 m
Type of engineCFM International, CFM 56-5B6/B
Max. thrust2 x 23,500 lbs
Fuel capacity19,100 kg
Max. range fully payload4,500 km
Max. payload14,000 kg
Max. take-off-weight68,000 kg
Max. landing weight61,000 kg

Airbus 320

Airbus 320 side view Airbus 320 seats
Type of aircraftShort- & medium-haul passenger aircraft
ManufacturerAirbus Industrie, France
Names - Austrian Airlines paintingOE-LBI/Marchfeld, OE-LBJ/Hohe Tauern, OE-LBK/Steirisches Thermenland, OE-LBN/Osttirol, OE-LBO/Pyhrn-Eisenwurzen, OE-LBP/Neusiedlersee (Retro-look painting), OE-LBQ/Wienerwald, OE-LBR/Bregenzer Wald, OE-LBS/Waldviertel, OE-LBT/Wörthersee, OE-LBU/Mühlviertel, OE-LBV/Weinviertel, OE-LBW/Innviertel, OE-LBX/Mostviertel (Star Alliance painting)
Number of aircraft16
Seating capacity168 C/Y (variable)
Min. Legroom30"=76.2cm
Wing span34,1 m
Length37,6 m
Height11,8 m
Max. cruising speed980 km/h
Max. cruising altitude11,920 m
Type of engineCFM International, CFM 56-5B4/2P
Max. thrust2 x 27,000 lbs
Fuel capacity19,100 kg
Max. range fully payload4,300 km
Max. payload16,790 kg
Max. take-off-weight75,900 kg / 77,000 kg
Max. landing weight64,500 kg

Timetable

Flight number from to dep. arr. operating days travel duration validity Plane
 
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  • We
  • Th
  • Fr
  • Sa
  • Su
OS 601 VIE DME 11:00 14:50
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02:50 06.01.2016 - 26.03.2016 320 Book
OS 671 INN DME 13:20 18:45
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03:25 09.01.2016 - 05.03.2016 319 Book

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From compact cars to luxury limousines: The best-priced car hire offers in Moscow are available on austrian.com. The new, online booking platform searches more than 1500 providers in over 174 countries. It couldn’t be any easier: Enter your dates, select the car of your choice and simply pay with a credit card. Prefer a convertible to the SUV you already booked? Free changes and cancellations up to 24 hours before pick-up is included in all offers.
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Moscow

EAT in Moscow:

House of Writers

No doubt: Russians have made history in the fields of literature and thinking. If you also want to be kissed by a Muse one day, don't miss visiting the House of Writers, where the illustrious guest list reads like a Who's Who of Nobel Prize winners.   Boris Pasternak was here and Leo Tolstoy enjoyed the atmosphere as much as Solzhenitsyn or Mikhail Bulgakov. At the panelled dining room already the Free Masons enjoyed their supper, and at the next room the writing youth of the Sixties convened, leaving their autographs and sketches on the walls. Today the regulars include those who can afford the place as prices might get you close to bankruptcy. Hot tip: The buffet in the basement of the Art Nouveau building is cheaper and lets your fantasy run wild with unconventional paintings and furniture and well-assorted book shelves.   The service is typically Russian though: slightly arrogant, a bit slow, somewhat gruff. But never mind the service and be assured that after a delicious European-cuisine-style meal, an excellent cigar and a wonderful coffee you will be the one to write the next bestseller.

Stay Hungry

The three girlfriends Anna Bichevskaya, Aliona Ermakova and Liya Mur select 20 guests once a week to put on their guest list. Chosen from a pool of members of the closed Facebook group Stay Hungry. Also the cook who devises the culinary aspect of the evening in a grand, yet modern apartment is carefully selected: a food blogger, a friend or Elena Zaeva, an amateur cook who brilliantly prevailed against a professional cook on a Russian cooking show.   Apart from a delicious dinner Bichevskaya, Ermakova and Mur - founder of iknow-travel, PR consultant at icon-Food and owner of a catering company - especially bet on the social aspect of the event: counteracting the solitude of the metropolis, introducing friends to friends, having nice conversations and afterwards adding friends on Facebook that you actually know in real life.

Correa?s

At Correa's they know how to turn walk-in clients into regulars: The fact that the menu changes every week attracts curious gourmets again and again.   What doesn't change are the regional and seasonal classics conjuring up light meals from the otherwise so heavy Russian cuisine. Fresh mint, fresh lettuce from the garden and fresh fruit juices are the cornerstones on which culinary pleasures thrive - in addition to a restaurant that is as basic as its ingredients. The Correa's has done away with all redundant stuff and kept only what's really necessary. Instead of superfluous pomp visitors are confronted with a plain modern ambience in the style of an American trend café.   Any occasion fits - be it breakfast, lunch or dinner. And while the menu is changing, you will also find the one or other fixed element in it. Here's my suggestion: The chocolate cake goes completely without flour and still has a heavenly taste!

SHOPPING in Moscow:

Arbat & Tverskaja

If you come to Moscow for shopping you have to keep two names in mind: Arbat and Tverskaja. They're like a spell once spoken they you will be on the brink of bankruptcy. In the 19th century the Arbat was the district of the nobility.   After the great fire in 1812 they built their villas and city houses here. It is Khrushchev's fault that this beautiful old district is not as magnificent any longer as it used to be. The latter had parts of it destroyed. Where in the past the villas were located, there is today the 70 metre-wide Nowyj Arabtk, a popular shopping street. Parallel to it you'll find the Arbat street, Moscow's first pedestrian zone with neat cafés and shops. During the summer you can sit outside and watch the souvenir sellers, musicians and street artists. Along the pedestrian zone beautiful old buildings line up - the residences of the newly rich in town. No wonder - not everybody can afford this expensive district.   Here comes my suggestion: Stick to the street artists and keep away from the enticing shopwindows. Or don't give a damn and walk to the Red Square. There, the Tverskaja Uliza starts, where the concentration of sparkling facades will finally take away what's left of your willpower. And you will start a high-heel race with the Russian elite.

Transilwanija

Here's another bloodsucker: While the Transilwanija sells its CDs at top prices, you are confronted with pure nostalgia here. But first you have to find the store as it is well-hidden in the backyard of the Crab House restaurant. The search pays off as you will spend at least as much time there (you can't get through 50,000 CDs that easily). But don't worry: the stuff is well-assorted and you won't search long if you know what you want. The system is based on countries, so look for New German Music, Old German Music or Very old French Music.   Above all fans of old CDs will get their share. Scandinavian World Music and Old US Rock complete the musical roundtrip and get us to the titles. The Transilwanija's offer includes hits from the GDR as well as Japanese pop, rare electronic music as well as very rare electronic music - and if you get lost, you can still ask the profound shop assistant for help.

Traffic+

At first sight you might think that the dresses, jackets and pants at Traffic+ all pretty much look alike. Lots of black and white, a few dashes of colour. But such an impression is wrong for every piece is unique. The art- and media-loving clientele of the Muscovite store appreciates that. They come because of the 40 international labels that cannot be found elsewhere in the city. Amongst them: Baum und Pferdgarten, Hache, Royal RepubliQ or Lilith.   Traffic+ also has a big sister, her name is Traffic and she's four years older. The shelves at Traffic are also packed with designer clothes that are selected by the store owners from all over the world. Every piece has its own story, otherwise it wouldn't have made its way into the line of goods. Where the ideas for the dressing rooms made of plastic tubes, the garden gnome at the shoe rack and the factory lights come from couldn't be found out. What a pity.

SIGHTS in Moscow:

KGB Museum

Lubyanka: Many Russians get goose bumps at the mention of this name.  The KGB headquarters was once the venue of hundred-thousand tortures and those who survived the Stalinist terror were either executed or sent to a Gulag. The KGB Museum often tries to hide this fact, rather focusing on the strange side of espionage today. If you are interested in the Cold War, you will like this place. And don't worry: You won't disappear. Sticking to the principle of Glasnost Russia today is very eager to reveal to tourists anything that was top-secret before: bugs, for example. There are cameras in lighters, so we ask ourselves whether all Russian spies had to smoke in the past.   The secret remains unanswered, so we continue to the coke cans with explosives and the loot that could be taken from the hated Americans. An American spacecraft is the main attraction of the museum. The KGB has long since resolved but the building has remained. Today Lubyanka is the seat of FSB, the Russian secret service. It was headed by Vladimir Putin for one year.

Cosmonaut Museum

The architecture alone enthrals all fans of space travel: The Cosmonaut Museum looks like a giant stream on which a rocket, at an altitude of 107 metres, is soaring into space. The whole monument is titanium-clad, sparkling in the sun. But don't worry: Once you are inside the white spots in front of your eyes will disappear again. Inside it becomes clear to you why the Russians are pros in the field of space travel. In honour of the first space flight by Gargarin the museum exhibits technology, history and personalities of Russian cosmonautics.   The main hall features sculptures sunk into the floor. While they don't seem to make much sense they are beautiful anyway. Moon rock, perhaps? No, it's glass, for sure. But let's start our tour now. Here, the space suits from the sixties are exhibited and over there you see parts of Gargarin's landing capsule. If you pass Sputnik you see the moon robot Lunochod. A film documentary tells you the whole story. After all, Russia was not only the first to send a man into space but also the first dog. The dog Laika was the first living creature in space, however, she did not return. Belka and Strelka, who also undertook a trip, were luckier. They are exhibited at the museum today.

Moscow Zoo

Those who come in the summer will ask themselves right at the entrance what the wild birds will do during the winter period. Before you start knitting shawls for them, be assured: The pond doesn't freeze in the winter because it is heated by a compressor. Also the wild cats don't get cold - they have their own fur and if temperatures go below zero, the white tigers, panthers and lions have a protected indoor area at their disposal as well. The spectacled (or Andean) bear is used to the cold. It comes from the Andes but is almost extinct there and so seldom that he is the main attraction of the zoo.   The dolphins are also drawing visitors galore, staging up to eight shows per day and enthralling kids with their performances. Also the beluga whale has to work hard for his money, performing numerous jumps for visitors. Ticket sales start one hour prior to the show. But there are smaller animals as well. If you don't dare to go close to the whale you can also watch a wide variety of spiders, bugs and butterflies at the Insecttopia. Got an itch yet? Go to the zoo!

STAY in Moscow:

Artel Hotel

The dream of every graffiti artist: The Artel subscribes to graffiti, neglecting old traditions. Already at the front desk you get a feeling for the hotel's spirit: Bricks and a slogan sprayed casually onto the wall welcome the guests.   The hallways are laid out colourfully and there's modern art on the walls. But is the room as great as the hallway promises? If you have booked a design room you won't be disappointed: There's graffiti art on the walls and the small rooms boast fancy interior. While the room is kind of small (20 square metres), you sleep amidst Argentine spray art, something in between comics and religion, psychedelic dreams and folklore.   Other rooms are more Expressionist; even Andy Warhol served as inspiration for the art on the walls. In all the rooms you feel like checking in a fancy club - and that's not so far-fetched as the hotel houses a trendy bar featuring Russian underground live music on three evenings a week. And what about a good night's sleep? Well, you can still go down to the restaurant and have some vodka with your meal - then you'll be able to sleep for sure. Double room from 120 euros per night.

Kempinski

While Kempinski is a German company, the hotel has a typical British demeanour. It is reserved, always obliging but surrounded by royal luxury. The location is alone is terrific: The Kempinski is within an Earl Grey's reach from the Red Square. You can almost touch the onion towers when opening your windows. Numerous artists used to have their studios in the rooms of the hotel, the view from it immortalised on canvas. Today, guests enjoy the fantastic vista without an easel.   The interior of the luxury hotel boasts exquisite fabrics, marble baths and warm shades. W-Lan, flat-screens and English dailies are useful add-ons for manager. But do relax and recreate at the spa as well: In the indoor pool you can leave the daily grind behind. Your personal trainer will help you reduce your stress level at the fitness centre and a massage will make you forget all worries. And do eat! After having killed so many calories you may well treat yourself a hearty Japanese, French or Russian dinner. Have a tea and two scones thereafter and you will feel like a Briton again. Double room from 510 euros per night.

Golden Apple

Quite astonishing what hides behind the 19-century facade. Instead of redundant opulence the hotel impresses with apple trees. Inside, the hotel features avant-garde elements. While the colours of the rooms are rather masculine, stylish stools and designer lamps set colourful contrasts. The bathrooms are laid out in marble, there are accessories by Philippe Starck and the Loft Suite even features its own kitchenette. You don't need the latter though, not being able to compete with the international restaurant anyway.   Here's our suggestion: Come for dinner in the evening as the restaurant will have a special surprise for you then alongside with Russian cuisine. In the evening, the blinds will go down and the apple trees will be projected onto the blinds. Our conclusion: With his minimalist style, the Canadian designer Raphael Shafir has created a boutique hotel of chrome and much colour, attracting a clientele with a preference for trendy styles. Double room from approx. 200 euros.